Jesus Without Language

Kid's Ministry & Sunday School Resources

Having fresh eyes on a bible passage

 
About a month ago, I received this comment about my talk posts:
 

Her interpretation of the Bible stories is usually from a very different perspective from mine….makes me think!

 
After recently blogging about the process of teaching being a process of learning for both the child and the leader, you can imagine I took this as a huge compliment.

I firmly believe that Christian parents should be reading the well known stories of the bible to their children, that the teaching time should be additional to that. In that light I often strive to see different twists on the stories as a way of diving deeper into what may already be familiar.

However old or new the passage is to me, I always start with these 3 : perspective, history, and application.

Fresh eyesHaving fresh eyes on a bible passage

The bible gives us lots of room to move our viewpoint. It’s often useful to identify all the characters, who is speaking, who is on the sidelines. Could the story be told with a different voice? When you look at David and Goliath from the philistine camp it looks very different, the character of David pales before the might of God. Imagine telling the story of Jesus’s temptation from the view of the sand dunes or perhaps an angel taking watch in Heaven. Also, speaking from a different time frame allows us to show outcomes of actions rather than leave the story hanging outside of the big bible narrative, many of these stories came by oral tradition.

Having fresh eyes on a bible passage
Historical study on a basic level makes a big difference. Social history can place a story and inform you of the important factors through the witnesses eyes. Where in time was the story placed? What the clothes, food, and social rules were, can shape the events? Fishermen were amongst the hardest hit by the tax collectors in gospel times and the Sabbath rules make Jesus’s actions even more scandalous. Also go wide on the personal history of the characters, the other times they appear in scripture. Their past and future, shape how we see the actions in a given story. Mordecai was a descendant of Saul who had fought the Malachites, Haman’s people, the story is an important echo of events.

Having fresh eyes on a bible passage
Often we choose the controlling action in a story in a bid to get the children to, or not to, repeat it. Acts of the bible aren’t always repeatable, but the emotions and motivations often are. I had always taught John the baptist linked to baptism, but on JWL I linked it to humility. Here was the great newspapers Elijah so humble that he wouldn’t dare to untie the sandal of Jesus. I’ve never baptised anyone, but I can show humility. Equally, the negatives aspects can also be positive. Saul’s blindness was a gift, for his eyes opened in more ways than one. Examining the ways of worship, and discoveries made can also lead to a huge array of applications that can move passages from the dry page and into everyday action.
 

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Are you learning?

 
Let me paint you a picture.

The conference was but a few days long: There were streams of teaching – small group sessions where we explored together, beautiful united worship – though we spoke a plethora of languages, and much sharing of stories. During the first meeting we were told we would not simply be talked at but learn from each other, as we journeyed together. At the final seminar we sat in the auditorium for a Q&A . On the stage were the session leaders, people who had taken each group through 8, hour long, conversations on an aspect of ministry. So, I asked the question “What have you learnt during this conference?” * and silence ensued. The leaders looked at each other uncomfortably, the audience shifted in their chairs as the pause became a gap. Slowly some of the respect I had for these leaders imparting their discoveries about God’s Kingdom started to evaporate. Eventually two ventured answers, the others didn’t even try.
 

Teaching is not a one way process. We should learn from the process of teaching. Sometimes we learn something new, sometimes we re-learn something and rediscover something we had forgotten.

 
However much we nod our head at this statement many of us simply don’t take the time to look at the lesson as a place to feed us as teachers. For many teaching becomes a one way process of giving, rather than an act of discovery as we join in reading the life giving scriptures together. This can lead to resentment at being ‘stuck’ in the children’s ministry and not able to be fed in the ‘adult’ service.

So where can we look to learn? Here are a few suggestions – feel free to add yours in the comments below.


What does this passage reveal about the world at that time or in general?
How would this story challenge me if I’d never heard it before?
How can this story transform a child’s life?
What insights can the mind of a child bring to my perspective?
How can I reflect on this passage through the week?
What have I learnt abut the materials and mechanisms of teaching this lesson?
What have I learnt about the mind and heart of a child today?
What have I learnt about my church community today?

are you learning

 
* the question was specifically, “What have you learnt, as opposed to been inspired by, at the conference?” – the conference was very inspiring, but inspiration doesn’t change things, things change when we learn to act upon them.

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The hidden value of using colour

 

The most frequent comments to this site concern colour templates. Some posts have black and white templates, others don’t. While I’m always happy to make up a colourless template if requested, I think we should try to print in colour if possible. Why?…..

colour

number-1 We know, ‘You’re worth it’.
If you were to buy your crafts they would come in colour. Colour is synonymous with worth, and it sends a message of value to the child. It tells them that this is an original, not a photocopy, that this was created for them, and that they are worth the extra. Photocopying has it’s place, but don’t be fooled into thinking that kids and parents don’t notice.

number-2 This resources is worth it
For years I was led to believe colour printing was too expensive. I’d spend a fortune on craft equipment, pens, glue, ribbons, and pipe-cleaners, but not on printing. Finally, I started to do the maths. A colour cartridge (or set) lasts for 100 ink heavy pages on a ink-jet printer or 2000+ on a laser. Buying recycled/refilled ink cartridges makes the price per page surprisingly small.

number-3 Colouring should engage you with the story
If you’ve ever sent a kid home with a half coloured template or watched enthusiastic kids spend an age colouring sides of houses, you may resonate. That is not engagement with the story. If you group loves colouring then give them a colouring page or ask them to draw a picture about the story.

number-4 We value time
Much like the point above, getting kids to do colouring can be a long process, printing in colour gives more time for an extra game, or a longer discussion time, or another craft to explore a different side of the story. The time we have with the youngsters is precious.

number-5 We want this to look good
Call me vain, but when I get my crafts to the stage I can print in colour and make them up I think they look better than the self coloured versions. If we are going to take time creating something let it be the best it can be. Something we are proud to show parents.
 

Notes,
I do use white backgrounds and lighter colours when I can.
Investing in a cheap laser printer is well worth the money.
Find a service that can re-fill (and possibly re-chip) your cartridges.
I realised today that I can print 100 pages of colour for the price of a packet of felt tip pens.
+ Paper is easier to recycle than the pen jackets!

 

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One Child – One Week – Prayer

 
prayPrayer is powerful, and each church needs to have someone praying for the young people in their church.

It is important to differentiate between prayer for the young peoples ministry, and prayer for the specific young people. I have found that often the former is much more widely prayed for than the latter. This little card is an easy way to ask specific adults to pray. In the example I have not put the child’s full name, it is designed to be filled as much as is needed and nothing more, the child’s name could be left blank. Print the cards any size you wish, the back of the cards is a summery of the 8 steps if you wish to print it.

The prayer challenge with the card is to use it to pray for a child for one week, using the following 8 points as a guide. At the end of the week, if appropriate, the child can be informed that somebody from church was praying for them this week. The graphic to one side can be printed and placed on the noticeboard – for the prayer cards and the graphic please click on the images and a larger quality image will load. (Please do not pin to image files, but to this page – use the built in pin button to pin the large image.)
 

One Child - One Week - Prayer
 
One Child - One Week - Prayer
 
One Child - One Week - Prayer
One Child - One Week - Prayer Start your prayer time by putting aside your issues, both those from today and from your own childhood. Ask God to help you pray unbiased for this child and their needs. Thank God for bringing this child’s needs to you.

One Child - One Week - Prayer Be specific about the child you are praying for. Bring the child to mind if you know them, or use whatever information the card gives. Lift this individual to God as his child and his servant in his kingdom.

One Child - One Week - Prayer Be age specific. Is this an exam year, is there anything in the local news that may effect them, etc. Below is a simple 4 word description of areas that may generate issues by age group, this is very general but may be useful as a starting place for some.
 

0-1 years
Feeding, Sleeping, Movement, Communication
1-2 years
Independence, Language, Instructions, Self Awareness
2-3 years
Cooperation, Separation anxiety, Defiance, Inter-dependence
3-5 years
Friendships, Exploration, Personality, Pre School
6-8 years
School, Acceptance, Awareness of future, Independent goals
9-11 years
Relationships, Responsibility, Puberty, Peer pressure
12-14 years
Body image, Academic results, Stress, Complex thought

 
One Child - One Week - Prayer Siblings deeply shape a child’s everyday life. Consider praying for issues surrounding fairness and sibling rivalry, the process of sharing, and the strength to support each other. For single children pray for issues surrounding friendships, autonomy, and demanding attention.

One Child - One Week - Prayer Pray for the parents. Pray for their lead in discovering God, their relationships, and their ability to provide for their children. Consider that for a child provision of love is arguably the most important.

One Child - One Week - Prayer Pray for their contact with church. the group they are part of – it’s group dynamic and the leaders who serve. Pray for the groups needs and how they may influence the child.

One Child - One Week - Prayer Pray for their strengths and passions Praise God for their gifting and ask him to open opportunities to use that gifting in the child’s life. Pray that they can receive the encouragement and necessary tools to develop their gifting.

One Child - One Week - Prayer Pray for the child’s weaknesses and struggles. Pray that God will be with them in the dark moments they may encounter. Pray for strength, reassurance and confidence to face what may be troubling them and peace for the end of their journey through the present trials they face.

 

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Preparing to Teach : David’s Anointing

 
Preparing to Teach : David's Anointing
 

Quick notes:

David was the youngest son, but don’t let that fool you, many scholars think David may have been around 20 at the time of this story.

Samuel was such a scary man he had to send word to the elders at Bethlehem to say he came in peace.

Little is known about his appearance though he is often called ruddy, which may mean he had a tinge of red in his hair. Also he is described as handsome and a bit short!

Just as in most of the biblical stories, to keep sheep denotes that he was considered the least of the brothers, but God has a way of choosing the ‘least’.

It is suspected that David’s family was of modest means, but little is known and David’s mother is never named.

David is anointed but not as king, rather as a chosen one, the elect of God. His anointing was not meant as a threat to Saul and his kingship would not begin for at least another decade.

Names you need to know

 
Samuel – the great judge and prophet (pretty miserable as he mourns God’s favour leaving the present king Saul)

David – means beloved, youngest son of 8

Jesse – David’s dad (we don’t know who mum was)

Eliab – the most visually impressive looking brothers

7 Brothers – you don’t need to know the names but 6 of them can be found in 1 Chronicles 2:13-15, the unnamed is presumed to have died or been from a concubine.
 

Historical significance

 
Samuel comes to make an offering and invites people to sanctify themselves and join him, but he singles out Jesse’s household by sanctifying them himself. this means they were probably invited not simply to spectate but to join the meal. If a great man invites you and your sons to join him in a sacrifice and feast it may seem strange that you have sent one of your sons out to tend the sheep. We also know from later accounts that David leaves his employ as kings musician to occasionally return to the flock of sheep. From whatever angle you look at this it seems counter effective. Jesse sending David shows that, while he named him with a word meaning beloved, he believed him less likely to be honoured by the great judge. Equally David’s choice to take the task, if it were optional, shows his self worth as particularly low. Alternatively we could suggest that out in the solitude was a place David found more comfortable, though perhaps not the greatest asset for a future king…?

infographic-david-good book companyDavid is no small kid, probably already hitting his teens, if not emerging from them, he would not have been allowed to hide from fear itself. Though fear would have tinged the greeting in that household. Samuel was not a gentle man, and his feats of demonstrating God’s power had resulted in many deaths, you would not wish to cross him. Yet, so human, he falls quickly pray to the human sight, singling out the impressive muscle of Eliab as the most likely contender. This is doubly surprising as Samuel had just walked away from Saul, who was every bit a great king visually.

What is particularly pertinent to this tale is that while Samuel finally has his eyes opened to David being the right son to anoint his never announces why. Then Samuel leaves and David goes back to the sheep. While God has powerfully come into the picture from an outsiders perspective little seems to have changed. Yet, importantly, this was not an empty ceremony, David experiences the Spirit of God descends on him, allowing his to grow wise, courageous and strong. He built the characteristics of a prince elect from the heart outwards. His heart was touched by the grace of God and it’s not surprising that the songs of this shepherd boy become the great psalms, so great that soon the present king will beg him to come sooth his woes with the sound.

If you want to put David’s like in context there is a great info-graphic by the good book company. (Pictured in small here)
 

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Preparing to Teach : Esther

 
Preparing to Teach : Esther
 

Quick notes:

This is probably the earliest version of ‘the bachelor’ game. These women had a full year of beauty treatments, Hegai would have been the shows presenter, and surprise-surprise, his favoured choice won! But, Esther is said to have pleased him, and won his favour, not a phrase about simply outward beauty but about character. The women were richly rewarded however, being able to claim palace treasures in the form of adornments for their time with the king. Esther is a testament to listening to good advice, for her not to chose riches when she went to see the king but rather to take only what was advised was a great restraint on her part and a great sign on wisdom.

Esther is was not a Jewish name, but a rouse to help her conceal her Jewish identity, the name Hadassah would have given the game away far too soon. Concealed identities is a common theme to the modern day Purim celebrations where people dress in costume.

As the famous verse echo’s ‘for such a time as this’, we too have a plan and a purpose for our lives. However glamorous it sounds, being queen in a foreign land, denying your Jewishness, and concealing your true name doesn’t sound like a good place to be if you want God to use you. This story is a call out to all those of us who feel like we’re feel trapped in secularism and those of us who feel like it would be easier to make a difference if we had a greater need presented to us.

There is a modern movie about this story called ‘A night with the king’.

Names you need to know

 
The King – Xerxes or Ahasuerus in the Hebrew (but may have been Darius)
Haman – the baddie, Agagite and therefore a sworn enemy of the Jewish nation
Modecai – wise kind uncle, had a position at the palace, devote Jew
Esther – also called Hadassah, young, beautiful, virginal
Hegai – king’s eunuch, in-charge of the harem of women
 

Historical significance

 
There is great debate about weather this is indeed a true tale or one that was used to proselytise a Persian celebration and surrounding story. The names of the characters are surprisingly similar to localised deities of the time. While scholars debated the acts of Esther, the powers that be agreed to allow it to continue as a minor Jewish feast. On the 13th day of Adar the celebration of Purim continues.

Who the king in the story really is has also been widely debated. Most modern translations use the name Xerxes though some retain the Jewish choice of Ahasuerus. Equally the text about Mordecai being brought into captivity is ambiguous, dependant on the reading of the text he could be over 100 years old, have the same name as his ancestor, or it may have been the names meaning misconstrued to refer to ‘servant of God’. Mordecai probably worked within the palace, to be at the kings gate is an indication of this.

Haman is an Agagite, a descendant of the Amalekites. This tribe of people have a long history of attacking the Jewish nation, sometimes alone and sometimes teaming up with other nations. As early as the book of Exodus (chapter 17), the word is given that God will ‘blot out the name’ of Agag (the traditional name of the leader of the Amalekites). Even modern day Purim traditions decree making loud noises to cover the name of Haman when the story of Esther is read.

Mordecai is described as a descendant of the king Saul. This is supposed to bring your mind back to the war where Saul fought the Amalakites. Saul is commanded to commit complete genocide, every man woman and infant alongside all their livestock is to be wiped out. Saul disobeys and this decision loses his favour with God and his kingship. Within the story Haman is portrayed as a direct descendant from Agag (the Amalekite king), bitter at the Jewish nation for the destruction of his people, and leaving Mordecai and Esther to do what Saul could not.

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Building your team – The Childless

 
Being a parent is a huge gift, being a grandparent too.
But the church is a melting pot of people and offspring can be a delicate issue
Kids ministry is all about kids, but as you look at those who care for them you find both parents and many many others.
 
The childless tend to fall into 3 categories, the single, the elderly and the others.
Every stage has possible ramifications to how the leader sees the children. If you haven’t taken time to think about this issue I’d encourage you to take a moment and read the tables below.
  …continue reading

Teachers Pages

 
The monthly newsletter had contained a teachers page until recently, this month with the celebration of a full year of the site the newsletter will change and so for those who missed them here are the teachers pages set so far. Simply click on the image for the relevant PDF.

If you have suggestions for more teachers pages please leave me a comment and I’ll make set 2 in the coming months.
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Donations ( + Lesson Sets ) this month: target - £ 50

£ 44